Bodybuilding terms explained…

Understanding weight training and the terms used used in most advanced training programs:

Weight training helps tighten and tone your body from head to toe. When you add more lean muscle to your frame, your metabolism increases even more which means you will end up to burn more body fat while you are at rest.

So I just finished my first 4 weeks of the LiveFit trainer with no cardio…The reason why no cardio was to ensure that I add the muscle that I want. The aim here was some muscle building…

PHASE 1: WEEK 1 & 2 LiveFit Trainer

Repitition range of 3 Sets x 12 Reps per set:

“This is the muscle-endurance phase, and it’s based on a traditional training split. The goal is to prepare your muscles for a strength-training program that will also promote muscle growth. Not bodybuilder-quantity muscle, but leaned, toned muscle that’ll give your body the “lines” you’ve always wanted.

During these first two weeks I did 3 sets of 12 repetitions (3 X 12) per exercise, resting 60 seconds (give or take) in between each set.”

Week 3 & 4 LiveFit Trainer:

Week 3 marked the start of the muscle-building phase. The rep range fell to 10 reps so 3 sets of 10 repetitions per exercise so now we started to lift heavier. (3×10)

Remember your last repetition of 10 should be difficult but not impossible to complete. Remember, too easy, increase the weight; too hard, decrease it.

Today will be day one of Phase 2:

This is the start of intense muscle-building and the introduction of cardio, to kick-start the fat-burning. Oh yes bring it on!!!!

The repetitions in this phase fall between 8 and 10, with the exception of certain exercises, where really taxing the muscle requires more volume.

Work at 85% of your maximum effort, which means your last rep in each set should be a struggle but still doable.

Don’t sacrifice form for strength, and ask for a spot as you progressively lift heavier weight. Safety is key!

Lifting heavier means you’ll need longer rest periods between sets. For some exercises, you’ll feel ready to continue after one minute; other exercises might require two. Regardless, the rest period should be long enough to allow you to tackle each set with as much exertion as possible.

The one exception is when you encounter exercises grouped as a superset. This means performing an exercise set immediately after a different exercise set with nearly no rest taken between exercises (sets) — only enough to position yourself for the second exercise.

While we’re on the topic of definitions, you’ll also need to know what “lifting to failure” means: On your last set of an exercise, instead of lifting to a set number (rep), continuing to lift until the muscle is fatigued and another full rep can’t be performed.

Incorporating cardio:

Though lifting heavier will increase your heart rate, at this point in the program, we will begin to incorporate 4 days of medium-intensity cardio, done in 30-minute increments.

Forgoing the cardio in the first phase allowed your body to use all of the “clean” calories it consumed for everyday activities and building muscle. By introducing medium-intensity cardio in Phase Two, we’ll begin to facilitate fat burning, while minimizing the risk of losing any hard-earned muscle.

Exercise

Each individual movement (e.g., a seated pulley row, barbell curl, or seated calf raise) that you perform in your bodybuilding workouts.

Set

Group of reps (lifting and lowering a weight) of an exercise after which you take a brief rest period. For example, if you complete 10 reps, set the weight down, complete eight more reps, set the weight down again, and repeat for six more reps, you have completed three sets of the exercise. A grouping of repetitions that is followed by a rest interval and usually another set

Repetition (rep)

The number of times you lift and lower a weight in one set of an exercise. For example, if you lift and lower a weight 10 times before setting the weight down, you have completed 10 “reps” in one set.

Rest Interval

Pause between sets of an exercise, which allows muscles to recover partially before beginning next set.

Superset:

This means performing an exercise set immediately after a different exercise set with nearly no rest taken between exercises (sets) — only enough to position yourself for the second exercise. Supersetting involves doing two exercises with no rest in between.

Lifting to failure:

On your last set of an exercise, instead of lifting to a set number (rep), continuing to lift until the muscle is fatigued and another full rep can’t be performed.

Failure – That point in an exercise at which you have so fully fatigued your working muscles that they can no longer complete an additional repetition of a movement with strict biomechanics. You should always take your post-warm-up sets at least to the point of momentary muscular failure, and frequently past that point.

1 Rep Max:

The weight that allows a person to go to failure following just one rep.

Drop Sets:

Also known as strip sets, drop sets involve the immediate reduction of weight between sets with no rest. This will thoroughly burn out a muscle.

Rest-Pause:

Do a set to failure. Rest for 5 to 10 seconds then do a few more reps with the same weight. Do this once or a few times depending on your energy levels and how far you wish to push. With this technique you can take a weight you can only do for a certain number of reps and increase that amount.

Forced Reps:

Forced reps are a frequently used method of extending a set past the point of failure to induce greater gains in muscle mass and quality. With forced reps, a training partner pulls upward on the bar just enough for you to grind out two or three reps past the failure threshold.

Negative Reps:

One or two partners help you lift a weight up to 10-50% heavier than you would normally lift to finish point of movement. Then you slowly lower weight on your own.

Partial Reps:

Performing an exercise without going through a complete range of motion either at the beginning or end of a rep.

Pyramids:

Increasing the weight with each new set while decreasing the number of reps. The weight is then reduced and the reps increased.

Trisets:

Three exercises are performed consecutively without any rest.

GIANT SETS

Performing a series of 4-6 exercises, done with little or no rest between each movements, and a rest interval of 3-4 minutes between each giant sets. You can perform giant sets for either two antagonistic muscle groups or a single body part.

Note: Giant Sets are extremely intense. Great care should be taken when attempting to perform a giant set.

21s:

When performing 21s, 7 reps are performed in the lower half of the motion, then 7 reps are performed in the upper half, and the set is finshed with 7 complete reps.

Resource: bodybuilding.com / Jamie Eason LiveFit Training Program

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Brand & Marketing Manager | BA Graphic Design & Multimedia | Higher Diploma in Photography | USN Lifestyle Athlete | Busy studying Sports Nutrition & Supplementation | USN 12 Week Challenge Contestant | Passionate about healthy living and working out...

Posted on June 18, 2013, in Daily Post and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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